Isle of Man Friends of the Earth
Caarjyn y Theill Ellan Vannin


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PRESS RELEASES

1st March 2002

Isle of Man Friends of the Earth  Caarjyn y Theill Ellan Vannin

The Closure of Sellafield


Isle of Man Friends of the Earth welcome the House of Keys unanimous vote to:

".......seek early closure of Sellafield on safety and security grounds", and to ".......express its opposition to the commissioning of any further civil nuclear power reactors in the United Kingdom........".

Isle of Man Friends of the Earth hopes that the Isle of Man Government will now draw the logical consequences from this vote, and:

1. Publicly support the Irish and other Governments in the region in their campaign against the new MOX plant being commissioned at Sellafield;
2. Stop importing electricity derived from nuclear power from the United Kingdom by cable;
3. Actively promote the development of Renewable Energy on the Island with the aim to cover at the very least 10 percent of our needs by the year 2010 in line with the targets of the United Kingdom.


DRfarin Dr farin official
Perder peso agora!
http://dr-farin.com/pt/


 

 

 



Contact: George Uhlenbroek, Co-ordinator, Isle of Man Friends of the Earth 


29th October 2001

Isle of Man Friends of the Earth  Caarjyn y Theill Ellan Vannin

Ten Possible Landfill Sites Identified

Isle of Man Friends of the Earth has learnt that the The Isle of Man Government's Department of Local Government and the Environment ("DLGE") has identified 10 possible landfill sites which could be used for non-incinerable waste and for bottom ash from the incinerator. Whilst accepting the need for a landfill site, Isle of Man Friends of the Earth insists that a detailed environmental impact study and a full public consultation procedure must be carried out from the earliest stage, well before any final decision is taken and any work is carried out.

THE FACT THAT IT HAS BEEN POSSIBLE TO IDENTIFY 10 LANDFILL SITES ON THE ISLE OF MAN GIVES THE LIE TO ARGUMENTS WE HAVE HEARD IN THE PAST FROM OUR ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES MESSRS QUINE, GILBEY, GELLING, AND BROWN THAT THE INCINERATOR IS NEEDED BECAUSE WE ARE RUNNING OUT OF LANDFILL SITES. IT IS REVEALING THAT DLGE DISTINGUISHES MERELY BETWEEN INCINERABLE AND NON-INCINERABLE WASTE, NOT BETWEEN RECYCLABLE AND NON-RECYCLABLE WASTE. 

Of the so-called incinerable waste, most putrescibles are compostable, and most non-putrescibles such as paper and plastic products can be recycled and are likely to be by manufacturers in the future under EU law. If landfill is used as a depository only for non-recyclables these sites could last into the next century. But this would require that the Isle of Man Government pay more than just lip service to waste reduction and recycling.

Using DLGE's cost estimate of 1.5 million for the site at Jurby in the North of the Island, the Isle of Man could have ten lined, state-of-the-art landfill sites and still have 25 million left of the incinerator money (the cost of the incinerator exceeding 40 million). This 25 million would fund a top quality recycling service that would be the envy of the world and have money in hand to provide incentives to people and business to drastically reduce waste.

We want our Government to charge the full economic cost of the landfill of construction waste to the building industry (the biggest waste producer) and oblige builders to sort their waste. Ninety percent of builder's waste could be recycled (as in Holland). This would provide aggregates which would reduce the need for mining and quarrying, thereby reducing damage to the countryside, and would also provide wood for a local chipboard industry thus cutting down on expensive imports.

A good kerbside collection scheme for household waste could remove 60% of the waste, for recycling and composting.

THE GOVERNMENT HAS BEEN USING LACK OF BUSINESS INTEREST IN RECYCLING TO JUSTIFY INCINERATION. RECYCLING OF HOUSEHOLD WASTE SHOULD BE A GOVERNMENT SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC, IT IS NOT A BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY. ISLE OF MAN FRIENDS OF THE EARTH WANTS THE NEXT GOVERNMENT TO ACT ON THESE ISSUES DECISIVELY. IT WANTS THE NEW GOVERNMENT TO RE-NEGOTIATE THE CONTRACT WITH UNITED WASTE TO PROVIDE A COMPREHENSIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICE TO THE ISLAND WITH RECYCLING TARGETS SET AT 50% OF HOUSEHOLD WASTE AND 90% OF INDUSTRIAL WASTE.

Contact: George Uhlenbroek, Co-ordinator, Isle of Man Friends of the Earth 


6th October 2000

Isle of Man Friends of the Earth  Caarjyn y Theill Ellan Vannin

The Health Effects of Incineration

On October 3rd, The Minister of Local Government and the Environment presented a report to the members of Tynwald on the health effects of a waste incinerator on the Isle of Man.

1. The report was first brought to the public attention by Isle of Man Newspaper Limited, which also provided the public with some of its own conclusions. Isle of Man Friends of the Earth is of the opinion that this report should have been available to the public at the time it was leaked to the press so that the people could formed their own opinion if they wished. Matters of public health should take precedence over matters of commercial interest.

2 Depending on the composition and variable nature of the unsorted waste burned in a mass-burn incinerator, the electricity produced from 60,000 tonne is likely to average 4.8 megawatt/year or about 5 percent of the total electricity consumption on the Island by the time the incinerator is in operation.

3. MEA has announced plans to replace 3 out of 4 diesel generators by a gas-fired power generator, which will be responsible for generating the baseload requirement. This will greatly reduce particle emissions over the Douglas conurbation. A mass-burn incinerator is likely to produce 30 to 40 times as many particles per megawatt as a gas-fired power station.

4. It is expected that the gas-fired generator will be in operation at or before the time of the mass-burn incinerator. The mass-burn incinerator will therefore add to the air pollution over Douglas, not reduce it.

5. Throughout the report, the particulate emissions are referred to in terms of weight. There is no estimate of size distribution/number of particles. But scientific evidence has shown that it is the total surface area of these ultrafine particles that is important, which is determined by their size. Measuring particles by weight, without regard to particle size, has "little utility for judging effects.", said the U.S. National Research Council in 1979. Their high surface to volume ratio makes them chemically highly reactive and give them the property of catalysts. They also form an ideal site for the formation of dioxins and furans.

6. The chemical composition of the ultrafine particles is especially important. Those from the mass-burn incinerator contain heavy metals whereas particulates emitted from diesel engines are mainly carbon related. Those containing heavy metals (lead, mercury, chromium, cadmium, and others) are particularly toxic. One consultant gives particulate emissions in mg/cu.m. for three "commercially confidential" modern incinerators and estimates 2-5 mg/cu.m. for Isle of Man plant.

7. These ultrafine particles pass through the stack filters and pollute the air we breathe.

A mass-burn incinerator burning unselected waste, industrial waste and tyres will considerably increase the levels of heavy and transitional metals being introduced in the flue gasses When industrial wastes containing both chlorinated chemicals and metals are burned, dioxin and metals emissions increase. The Director of Public Health speaks of (quote) the emerging view in current literature that smaller particles below 2.5 microns may be responsible for the majority of adverse health effects ... (end quote)

Isle of Man Friends of the Earth demands that the government exercises caution in the interest of public health and applies the "precautionary principle", which says that if we are not 100% sure that an industrial process is safe, we should not use it.

8. No mention has been made of the ash produced by a mass-burn incinerator. The ash is contaminated with heavy metals (European Environment Agency, Feb. 2000, Technical Report 28, Dangerous Substances in Waste, p. 19). 95% of the dioxins produced are now found in the ash because of more efficient flue gas cleaning. Incinerators in the UK create about a million tonnes of contaminated ash per year.

9. The quoted reduction in vehicle road miles has nothing to do with incineration as such. Any kind of disposal site near Douglas instead of the Ayres would achieve the same. Incineration could actually increase vehicle mileage because it entails transport of large quantities of ash in addition of non-incinerable waste.

10. The Director of Public Health has been told that the intended recycling by DLGE of some construction waste and composting of some garden waste ("if economically viable") will constitute "significant levels of recycling".........

But recycling of construction waste has little bearing on incineration as only 20% is incinerable. Neither has recycling of glass and ferrous scrap metals.

According to Prof. Porteus, a typical MSW black bag contains a.o. 31% paper and card, 24% vegetable matter, 11% plastics, and 4.9% textiles, i.e. 71%, most of which are incinerable but in principle also recyclable. Non-incinerable recyclables are glass (8%) and metals (7.8%) making an overall total of 86.7% recyclable.

The table below, based on waste arising recently provided by DLGE, gives an estimate of possible recycling involving door-to-door collection of separated materials.

Origin                                          est. total (t.p.a.       est. recycling %       est. recyclable tonnage

domestic waste                            31,000                              70                            21,700

Civic Amenities                            14,500                              70                           10,150

commercial/collected                     6,000                               70                             4,200

commercial/delivered                     2,000                               50                             1,000

industrial                                        3,000                               30                             1,000

cardboard/plastic                           4,000                               63                             2,500

Collected from "Bring Banks", etc.

textiles                                             150                                                                    150

alu cans                                             18                                                                      18

glass                                                830                                                                    830

newspaper                                    1,000                                                                 1,000

office paper                                     650                                                                     650

Total MSW + industrial              63,148                                 68 %                       43,198 tonnes

Of the total 104,000 tonne per annum to landfill, 32,000 is recyclable and non-incinerable construction waste and 43,000 tonnes (see above) is fully recyclable, leaving 29,000 tonnes of presently non-recyclable and partly incinerable waste, including animal, clinical and tyres.

Tyres cause high levels of toxic particles, especially metallic. They should not be burned. In the UK, there are advanced plans for pyrolysis of tyres. They could soon be subject of EU "producer responsibility" legislation like cars and household appliances.

Isle of Man Friends of the Earth are of the opinion that the proposed mass-burn incinerator is unnecessary and contrary to accepted best practice for future waste and resource management.


2002 Isle of Man Friends of the Earth Caarjyn y Theill Ellan Vannin