Isle of Man Friends of the Earth
Caarjyn y Theill Ellan Vannin


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SCHOOL RESOURCES

FOR

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Contents

GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

SUSTAINABILITY STORIES

ENERGY & NATURAL RESOURCES

SCHOOL GROUNDS

WILDLIFE, ECOSYSTEMS & LOCALITY

RIVERS

CLIMATE & WEATHER

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY

TRANSPORT

ARTS & MUSIC

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

FOOD & FARMING

CITIZENSHIP

GOOD EXAMPLES

BACKUP INFORMATION FOR TEACHERS


GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT


Sustainable Development is now part of the National Curriculum and kids are encouraged through a number of subjects to learn about environmental issues and the practical things they can do to help make a difference.

And it is not only the pupils who can do their bit, teachers, parents. governors and the school itself can all take environmental actions. Schools are organisations like any other. They use electricity, water, produce waste, and people have to travel to get to them, all of which have an impact on the environment. There are many opportunities to do things that make a definite difference both to help the environment, reduce costs and build a sense of community.


Vivese Senso Duo https://www.vicodur.com/hu/vivese-senso-duo-velemenyek-az-olajrol-ami-megakadalyozza-a-hajhullast/
A recept az egészséges haj!
https://www.vicodur.com/hu/vivese-senso-duo-velemenyek-az-olajrol-ami-megakadalyozza-a-hajhullast/


 

 

 

 



Information for teachers
on what Education for Sustainable Development is and what schools should do about it is available at http://www.cee.org.uk/teachers/esd.html

"Resources for Schools" catalogue from the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) has a good variety of books, resources, renewable energy kits etc. Phone 01654 705959 for a free catalogue, or see the website: www.cat.org.uk Their non-schools catalogue is good too.

Books available from CAT include:
"Dr Art's Guide to Planet Earth". This is an outstanding book. Vividly, clearly and concisely Art Sussman explains how our planet works and what can happen when the balance of nature is upset. It will capture the imagination of readers of all ages (from 12 upwards) and invoke a sense of wonder.' Clear, concise and uniquely helpful. A very good overview. Good sense of humour. Preview of chapter 1 on the website:
www.planetguide.net also extracts and experiments: the book is much better though. This book is also a good introduction to how systems in general work, from ecosystems to human beings to car engines!

"Making it Happen: Agenda 21 and Schools" at 6.99 is good on citizenship as well as sustainability. Full of ideas and very informative, lots of excellent case studies of what ordinary people in ordinary schools have done.

Oxfam's education catalogue - many resources for many different curriculum areas - (history, english and media studies, literacy, numeracy, maths, science, technology, geography, arts, crafts, music, cookery), with an emphasis on citizenship and life in different countries. Phone: 01202 712933 email: oxfam@bebc.co.uk website www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet

Books include: "Making a Difference" A range of stimulating and fun activities, which encourage children to think about how they can be actively involved in making a difference. Covers electricity, water, recycling and fair trade, and makes local to global connections in each topic.'

The Neighbourhood Initiatives Foundation's Sustainability for Real is a teacher's pack which uses teamwork, thinking skills, model making and map work to allow school children to experience the complexity of environmental issues. Very good reviews. Sustainability for Real also helps them discover how local democracy can work in practice, and how they can be involved. Developed for KS1&2, cross-curriculum. This costs about 38: phone 01952 590777 email- nif@cableinet.co.uk web: www.nif.co.uk See 'publications' area of website for more detail and photos of the pack. www.iclei.org/egpis/egpc-113.html to see review.


Greenpeace has lovely online animated 'films' - about energy, rainforests and sustainable food production
http://www.greenpeace.org.uk Click on 'about us', then 'education' then 'nature power'.

Another online 'film' introducing global citizenship. Very thought provoking, lasts about 3 minutes.
http://www.luccaco.com/terra/terra.htm

Good, very professional, interactive site explaining Sustainability at the regional, town and neighbourhood scale - for older students: http://www.conservationeconomy.net/

Channel 4 has an animated interactive website backing up its programmes on citizenship and sustainability
http://www.4learning.co.uk/planet/index.html

The BBC has a good site - http://www.bbc.co.uk/learning

http://www.wwflearning.co.uk/activities/ lots of resources, including downloadable activities and lots of good examples of UK schools' ways of addressing citizenship and sustainability.

http://www.nc.uk.net/esd/ guidance for schools and teachers on the curriculum/sustainability/citizenship

A new sustainability video, due out 2002/2003. http://www.global-vision.org/sustainability/distribution2.html

http://members.lycos.co.uk/spiritofbaraka//baraka.php some absolutely amazing films on video. All have no narrative, but use panoramic shots, microphotography, time lapse photography, and pacy skilful editing to give an overview of the world, nature and humanity. eg Koyaanasquaatsi is a clear-eyed look at western civilisation...the title translates as 'Life out of balance'. The site gives links to suppliers.

http://www.sacredbalance.com/educators.html has some interesting thoughts on life and science.

A good site with lots of links to resources is North Norfolk Council
http://www.north-norfolk.gov.uk/council/directorates/chiefexec/policy/youth.html
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SUSTAINABILITY STORIES

1. Parachuting Cats into Borneo


Being the story of how in the 1950's the World Health Organisation parachuted hundreds of cats into Borneo. Back in the 1950's, the WHO started spraying the insecticide DDT in village ponds and ditches across Borneo in a plan to kill the mosquitoes that breed in water and spread malaria. The people lived in homes with thatched roofs. Suddenly the roofs collapsed. In addition to killing mosquitoes, the DDT had killed parasitic wasps that preyed on caterpillars that ate the roof materials. Without the wasps, the caterpillars multiplied out of control and destroyed the roofs. The local gecko lizards also died from eating DDT-poisoned insects. The dying geckos were caught and eaten by house cats that then died from the DDT.
The death of the cats caused an increase in rats, which threatened to cause an outbreak of bubonic plague (a terrible disease which is spread by rats). WHO then parachuted cats into Borneo to try to control the rat population. They clearly did not have this in mind when they began spraying DDT.

[From p73 of 'Dr Art's Guide to Planet Earth'. This story is to illustrate that all the parts of the web of life are connected via feedback loops: when we change the web of life, it is hard to predict the consequences. Dr Art's guide to Planet Earth has a website: www.planetguide.net : the book is better though.]

2. Darwin, The Old Ladies, The Cats and The Bees

Darwin was a keen observer of ecosystems. He used to tell a story about how he had found that English villages with more than the average number of old ladies had better hay meadows and fatter livestock. He worked it out eventually: Old ladies tend to keep more pet cats than most people. So a village with more old ladies in will have more cats. Cats eat plenty of mice. So, more old ladies means more cats, less mice. Mice are one of the few predators of wild bees' nests. So, more old ladies means more cats, less mice, more bees. Wild bees are essential to pollinate clover, which is an essential part of good hay meadows. So, more old ladies means more cats, less mice, more bees, more clover, better hay meadows. A good hay crop means plenty of food for the livestock over the winter, and they stay well fed and healthier.

[From the introduction to 'Companion Planting' by Bob Flowerdew.]

3. Zero Emissions Research Institute (ZERI)

ZERI is a charity based in Switzerland, which is working on designing 'industrial ecosystems' based on observing the nature of natural ecosystems. The aim is to set up networks of industry in which there is no waste and very little carbon dioxide production - the wastes of one industrial process provide the raw materials for another. They are running projects all over the world, some of them very successful (eg building earthquake-proof houses in South America, made out of giant bamboo).

One industrial ecosystem that interfaces well with the environment is based on breweries. Usually after a brewery has used barley, hops etc to make beer, the wastes are thrown into the local river: not good for the creatures living in it. However, in this system, the brewing wastes are heaped in a pile and mushrooms are grown on it. After the mushrooms are picked, the barley and hops is fed to pigs (apparently they love it.) The pigs produce one heck of a lot of muck, which is composted and sold to vegetable growers or farmers. It can even be used to grow more barley and hops, and complete the circle. So, in the one system there is beer produced, and a river full of waste. In the other system there is beer produced, plus a clean river, mushrooms, pork, compost and crops. [www.zeri.org]

4. Making a Difference

Back in 1994, Ray Anderson, a successful businessman, prepared a speech that changed his life. More than twenty years earlier, he had founded Interface, Inc., a company that is the world's largest producer of commercial floor coverings, making and selling more than 40% of all the carpet tiles used on Earth. Ray's speech helped make Interface much more interesting than a company that makes rugs for businesses. Ray had been asked to talk about his company's environmental vision. In preparing his speech, he realised that they did not have one. As he read and explored, he decided to change Interface from a company that was damaging the planet to one that was restoring it. And to keep making carpets while increasing sales and profits.

Since then, Interface has used systems thinking to eliminate waste and pollution. They calculated how much stuff they were taking from the Earth in order to make their products, and discovered that they were using five hundred thousand million kilogrammes of Earth materials, mostly fossil fuels. ray Anderson says it made him want to throw up. Five years late, Interface had reduced waste by about 50% and saved a lot of money in the process. The company uses at least 5 R's, beginning with reduce, reuse and recycle, and adding redesign and renewable energy. Their newest product will create zero waste and be produced using renewable energy rather than fossil fuels.

Another thing that has changed is that now customers can buy a service to provide carpet, rather than carpets. In the old days, Interface used to sell carpets, and that was the last they would see of them. Then when the carpet was worn out it would be thrown away, creating waste, and the customer would buy more. Now, the customer (usually a company with offices to furnish) buys a service, so instead of buying carpets, they sign a contract for Interface to keep their floors carpeted for, say, 10 years. When an area of carpet needs replacing, the customer phones up Interface. The same day, or the next day, someone turns up with a load of carpet tiles under their arm, puts in the new tiles and takes away the old ones. The old carpet tiles are completely recycled. The customers are happy - they are saved a load of fuss and bother, and Interface are happy as they are still being paid for producing less carpet than before. The new system is zero waste and a better deal for the customer. To quote Ray Anderson, Interface does well by doing good.

[From p112-114, Dr Art's Guide to Planet Earth www.planetguide.net www.interfaceeurope.com

5. Moving Up Scale

Biffa Waste Management, a recycling company, think most industries could follow the example of Interface. At the moment, our industrial system, and whole economy is like a giant conveyor belt. Raw materials such as metals, oil and timber are taken from under the ground or from the surface of the Earth, forest etc. They are processed into a form that industry can use: eg trees are made into paper of chipboard or MDF, iron ore is made into iron and then steel, crude oil is processed into petrol, diesel and many chemicals. This creates waste, pollution and carbon dioxide. These materials are then transported to factories (making more pollution), made into things which can be sold (more waste and pollution), transported to warehouses, then shops, then sold, used or kept for a time and then thrown away. Then they are usually thrown into a landfill site or burned in an incinerator. The bigger and faster this conveyor belt gets, the more raw materials are used, and the more pollution and waste are produced.

Biffa think that this 'conveyor belt' could be changed into more of a loop. Basically, new European laws are planned which will mean that companies which produce cars, fridges etc will soon have to take them back when the customers are finished with them, and then pay for them to be recycled. The first thing this will mean is that the manufacturers will make their products much easier to recycle. At the moment it is not very profitable to recycle most of the more complicated manufactured goods, as they were simply not designed to be recycled. But it can be done - for instance, Hewlett Packard have now designed their printers to be completely recyclable, and of course Interface recycle rugs.

Biffa say that changing to this new way of doing things will be ok so long as industries are given enough advance warning of the new laws, and (they would prefer) grants form government to change their factories and design systems. This would also mean that much less raw materials would be used, and many companies could copy the way Interface run their business, to suit their own area of trade. Biffa are a recycling company, so they see that there could be plenty of business for them in contract work from manufacturers.
www.biffa.co.uk www.natcap.org http://www.abc.net.au/science/slab/natcap/default.htm
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ENERGY & NATURAL RESOURCES

A really good introduction to energy, matter, zero waste and ecosystems is
'Dr Art's guide to Planet Earth' http://www.planetguide.net it is aimed at people from 12 to 120: very clearly illustrated and leads you through step by step easy to understand. Reviews and extracts on website.

www.windpower.org is an excellent interactive animated website with info, experiments and downloadable teachers' notes.

'Funergy' is a fun, cartoony energy site for younger kids, with energy-saving games etc http://www.funergy.org.uk

The Centre for Alternative Technology in West Wales, www.cat.org.uk , is probably the best visitor's centre in Europe, demonstrating renewable energy, organic gardening and other sustainable technologies. They are visited by hundreds of school parties a year. Visitors can stay on site in eco-cabins. They run a course on teaching sustainability. CAT publish or sell many books and leaflets for schools from KS1 to KS4 (eg 'Teaching about Energy' which won the TES Primary Science Schoolbook Award). They also sell solar, wind and water power kits, and Teacher's guides on how to make the most of them. Catalogue: 01654 705959. Non-schools catalogue 01654 705981/703743.

For younger people, "The Lorax" by Dr Seuss is a lovely fable and good introduction to thinking about natural resources. Available from Centre for Alternative Technology catalogue or general bookshops.

To calculate the impact of your lifestyle on the planet, visit www.ecologicalfootprint.org An "ecological footprint" is the area of land and resources that each person uses.

A Carbon Calculator to see your CO2 production is at http://www.globalactionplan.org.uk/aboutus/atschool.htm

also one at: Carbon Calculator http://www.carboncalculator.org

Advice on doing a School energy audit from http://www.eco-schools.org.uk/html/topics/energy/mainactivity.html

The official School Energy Saving site: has lots of curriculum resources, links, and examples of schools that have saved energy. http://www.schoolenergy.org.uk/se_england.asp

http://www.shu.ac.uk/schools/sci/sol/invest/light_2/light_m.htm
How to work out how much a school spends on lighting and how much it could save

Greenpeace has a lovely online 'film' about energy at: http://www.greenpeace.org.uk Click on 'about us', then 'education' then 'nature power'

UK Department of the Environment site for schools: lots of info and suggestions for the curriculum especially on energy. http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/climatechange/schools/index.htm

Lots of resources, games, cd-roms curriculum materials at: http://www.greencode.org.uk/

Pictures of the Earth from space, showing the lights - http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0011/earthlights_dmsp_big.jpg

www.wastewatch.org.uk have some free resources for schools on recycling

Schools Toolkit disk from DEFRA, UK http://www.bre.co.uk

To help schools reduce their environmental impacts. 'The Schools Toolkit can make a valuable contribution to student's education in several areas of the curriculum. Pupils can be involved in identifying problems, defining solutions and implementing changes, and in doing so will utilise maths, science and IT skills.' Every UK school received one. Contact Point: Alan Yates 01923 664000

http://www.sacredbalance.com/educators.html the 'games section' has 'climate change casino'
http://www.schoolenergy.org.uk/se_england.asp
http://www.wwflearning.co.uk/news/features_0000000190.asp

In March 1999, Cassop Primary School in Co. Durham became the first wind-powered school in Great Britain with the installation of a 50kw turbine in the school field.

'Scotland could be self sufficient in renewable energy' says minister, 2001:
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/pages/news/2001/12/SE5008.aspx
http://www.britishwindenergy.co.uk/news-centre.html

The best places for up to date information on climate change and its likely impacts are probably

The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

and the UK Met Office Hadley Centre www.met-office.gov.uk

Manx Energy and Natural Resources Society.
Contact: Tom Durrant, 801247 or Pat Kneen
The M.E.S. run solar car and solar boat competitions for schools, do slide show talks, and will give advice. They hope to be opening an energy advice centre at Silverdale soon, with hydro-electricity produced from the river.

Zero Waste Mann is a Manx charity promoting recycling and waste reduction. Contact Mr or Mrs Uhlenbroek, 862633 email: uhlenbroek@onetel.net.uk (Their daughter is the primatologist Charlotte Uhlenbroek, who presents TV and radio programmes, so they have a family interest in conserving tropical habitats).
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SCHOOL GROUNDS

Devon Agenda 21's illustration of what a sustainable school might look like:

http://www.devon.gov.uk/agenda21/school/educ.html#future

Learning Through Landscapes - www.ltl.org.uk publish ideas (and regular magazine) for making the most of school grounds.

Blueprints for people-sized sundials for school grounds are available from - www.argonet.co.uk/education/sunclocks
Modern Sunclocks, 1 Love Street, Kilwinning, Ayrshire, UK., tel 01294 552250
These are almost vandal-proof, very low maintenance and also look very nice - so very popular.

www.hdra.org.uk The HDRA organic gardening society has a very good site for school gardens - lots of advice and tips.

http://www.naturenet.net/education/index.html ideas for activities and lots of good links

http://www.arandaps.act.edu.au/environment/activity/humus/index.htm lots of good info activities and links from this homepage of an Australian primary school. Gardening/minibeasts/ponds etc

http://www.cee.org.uk/resources/info25.html

Nice tree planting website http://www.gn.apc.org/treesponsibility/

The Permaculture Association (Isle of Man) is a recently established Manx educational charity (permaculture means "design for sustainable living"). They have experience of working on school grounds: the fruit garden at Sulby School, and the wildlife garden, which pupils at the school helped design, and which includes a copse, a turf maze, willow dome and wildflower meadow. Would be willing to give advice on similar projects. Contact: Mill, 480882

The Wildflowers of Mann Project and Manx Wildlife Trust (801985) have also helped at Sulby.
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WILDLIFE, ECOSYSTEMS AND LOCALITY

The Manx Wildlife Trust should soon have a worker, paid for by the Dept of Ed, for giving advice on teaching about the Isle of Man's "natural heritage" (on the curriculum). Contact 801985.

"Dr Art's Guide to Planet Earth" is probably the best resource for12+, from www.cat.org - preview at www.planetguide.net

http://www.sacredbalance.com/educators.html includes an animation, maps and facts on how species create habitats for others, increasing biodiversity.

Common Ground - www.commonground.org , ideas for linking the arts, the conservation of nature and our cultural landscapes, town and country. Useful publications include:
"The Tree (How a Tree Works)", 4.00 - A1 colour poster.

The BBC education website has good ecosystem games at http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/explore.shtml
http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/ The general nature website has lots of other resources

http://www.naturegrid.org.uk/children.html rivers, very good interactive site - art, rivers, virtual pond dip, etc
www.wwf-uk.org/education (The World Wide Fund for Nature)
http://www.naturenet.net/education/index.html ideas for activities and lots of good links to wildlife education resources

http://www.hdra.org.uk/schools_organic_network/index.htm Good site for school gardens :'how-to' make and maintain a wildlife or food garden, notes for teachers in curriculum and a few interactive activities.

http://www.arandaps.act.edu.au/environment/activity/humus/index.htm lots of good info activities and links from this homepage of an Australian primary school. Gardening/minibeasts/ponds etc

Microcosmos is an extraordinary film.....takes your breath away' - BBC wildlife magazine.

This film takes us on an incredible journey through a meadow on an ordinary summer's day. By the use of Macrovision and extraordinary sound we get an minibeasts's eye view of a world in miniature, where exquisitely beautiful. tirelessly industrious and often extremely funny creatures are unearthed.

'Absolutely astonishing' - The Independent.

http://members.lycos.co.uk/spiritofbaraka//micro.php gives good reviews 'Microcosmos is the best microscope a kid ever had'. The site gives links to suppliers, eg. HMV: HMV.co.uk

www.rspb.org.uk have some resources, eg using maths.
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RIVERS

Riverside Explorer - an award-winning CD-Rom targeted at Key Stage 2 and 3 of the National Curriculum, an acknowledged resource for Key Stage 3 Geography.. Through Riverside Explorer children can learn about river wildlife habitats, how rivers shape the land, and how to perform a river survey. From the UK Environment Agency.

www.commonground.org.uk have some ideas for using the arts around the theme of rivers.
http://www.naturegrid.org.uk/children.html very good site which has a good interactive rivers and water cycle section

The Manx Rivers Improvement Association - MRIA www.mria.iofm.net will give info and advice. Contact: Bill Cottle 823733
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CLIMATE & WEATHER

"Dr Art's Guide to Planet Earth", www.planetguide.net has an online animated 'teach-in' about the greenhouse effect.

http://www.met-office.gov.uk/education/index.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/learning/library/climate_change/index.shtml

UK Department of the Environment site for schools: lots of info and suggestions for the curriculum

http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/climatechange/schools/index.htm
http://library.envirolink.org/start.html (Click on Greenhouse Effect)
http://www.epa.gov/globalwarming/kids
http://www.gcrio.org/edu/educ.html
http://www.gcrio.org/ipcc/qa/cover.html
http://gcmd.nasa.gov/Learning
http://www.ucsusa.org/globalresources/0warming.html
http://www.sacredbalance.com/educators.html online gambling with the climate: can sense win over inertia?
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DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY

'Dr Art's guide to Planet Earth' explains the principles sustainable design is based on: Earth Systems science, zero waste and ecosystems. It is aimed at people from 12 to 120 very clearly illustrated and leads you through step by step easy to understand. Really good pictures, and with Interface as an example of zero waste.

www.planetguide.net

www.stepin.org very good, colourful, interactive, easy to use website which supports-

"Live Well, Live Wisely" Teaching Pack. A global perspective on sustainable development for KS1 and KS2 in design, technology and geography. - from

www.itdg.org - The Intermediate Technology Development Group as well as stepin have done other packs, eg: "Wall to Wall Design" 'An exciting new pack to help you introduce KS3 students to sustainability that can make a real difference in the classroom.' Looks at the design and building of sustainable housing in the UK and Kenya, through the eyes of the people involved. Available from Oxfam's Resources for Schools catalogue. www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet Phone: 01202 712933 email: oxfam@bebc.co.uk

The Neighbourhood Initiatives Foundation - www.nif.co.uk
NIF sell a pack called "Planning for Real for Schools" for about 38: for KS1&2, cross-curriculum.
This teacher's pack allows school children to experience the complexity of environmental issues. It also helps them discover how local democracy can work in practice, and how they can be involved. Uses model making and teamwork.

www.natcap.org 'Natural Capitalism' is a book on profitable businesses and technology designed on the principles of ecology. Summary from author at http://www.abc.net.au/science/slab/natcap/default.htm

http://www.hockerton.demon.co.uk/ The Hockerton Housing Project is the UK's first earth sheltered, self-sufficient ecological housing development. This is a terrace of 5 houses in Nottinghamshire which are self-sufficient in energy and water, and "super-insulated". They sell: "Wall to Wall Design" pack for KS3, based on Hockerton, see above.

www.interfaceeurope.inc Interface is a very large company introducing sustainable manufacture.

www.zeri.org Zeri, the Zero Emission Research Institute have developed some ingenious sustainable technology. They aim for industry of 100% natural materials, and zero CO2 emissions, eg. invented an earthquake-proof house for South America, made of bamboo. See main entry above in "Sustainability Stories" section.

Gaviotas. A village in Colombia, South America. Founded in 1970. They have planted millions of pine trees on the arid land they live on - now rainforest is coming back under the pines. They make a living through inventing and manufacturing windmills and other ingenious machines such as solar powered cookers. Everything is designed to work for Colombia - " When we import solutions from northern countries, not only don't we solve our problems, but we import theirs." Gaviotas has no crime. see examples at end for links.

After nearly a quarter of a century, Gaviotas makes already stale phrases like sustainable development and appropriate technology seem not just believable, but fresh and surprising."

http://nt.oneworld.org/cfdocs/tve/ho/index.cfm
'Hands on' brings you information on what entrepreneurs and individuals around the world are doing in the fields of sustainable enterprise and appropriate technology.

The Permaculture Association (Isle of Man) is a recently established educational charity promoting 'the design of systems for sustainable living" Permaculture is a collection of design methods to help develop homes, farms and businesses such as those in this list. (Also to do eco-makeovers). They run courses and have an extensive library. Contact: Mill, 480882

UK websites - www.permaculture.co.uk and www.permaculture.org.uk
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TRANSPORT

http://www.cee.org.uk/resources/info27.html
http://www.schoolenergy.org.uk/se_england.asp
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ARTS & MUSIC

http://www.wwflearning.co.uk/resource/ has lots of examples of arts projects.
www.commonground.org.uk ideas for linking the arts and nature.
http://www.naturegrid.org.uk/expart/explart.html good site with nice pictures of outdoors projects.

see also the art of Andy Goldsworthy, who makes sculpture from leaves, piles of stones, footsprints etc.

Learning through Landscapes www.ltl.org publish a guide to Art in the school grounds.
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BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

The book 'Natural Capitalism' is a very highly recommended book which shows what industry and businesses are doing in this area. -- .'Leading-edge companies are practicing "a new type of industrialism" that is more efficient and profitable while saving the environment and creating jobs.' site: www.natcap.org summary talk from author at http://www.abc.net.au/science/slab/natcap/default.htm

http://www.conservationeconomy.net/ is a good site with an online slideshow of what a sustainable economy would look like .

www.interfaceeurope.inc Interface is a very large company introducing sustainable manufacturing.
www.zeri.org show some businesses run with ecological principles.

http://nt.oneworld.org/cfdocs/tve/ho/index.cfm
'Hands on' brings you information on what entrepreneurs and individuals around the world are doing in the fields of sustainable enterprise and appropriate technology.
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FOOD AND FARMING

http://www.greenpeace.org.uk organic farming animation: click on 'about us', 'education,' then 'nature power'
http://www.foodforum.org.uk/curriculum/ see 'citizenship and values'
http://www.countrysidefoundation.org.uk/GFG/index.htm
www.foodandfarming.org from farmers' associations, includes 'running an organic farm'
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CITIZENSHIP

An online 'film' introducing global citizenship. Thought provoking, lasts about 3 minutes.
http://www.luccaco.com/terra/terra.htm

Oxfam's education catalogue - dozens of good resources for many different curriculum areas - with an emphasis on citizenship and life in different countries. Compiled from many sources. Phone: 01202 712933 email: oxfam@bebc.co.uk www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet Interactive website.

Good books from Oxfam include: 'Making it Happen - Agenda 21 and Schools' and 'Making a Difference' both pitched at practical projects (in and outside school) to make a difference.

Oxfam also sell Seeing through the Spin a pack for analysing advertising and PR (or free download at www.babymilkaction.org/spin)"Aimed at KS4. "Every school should have this pack! Students will love to discuss the issues it raises. This is what education should be about." Professor Michael Reiss, Head of Science and Technology, University of London.

http://www.globalgang.org.uk/games_19.html Christian Aid have some good resources, and really nice online comics - funny stories about aliens eye view of earth good intro to global citizenship

The Neighbourhood Initiatives Foundation - www.nif.co.uk
NIF sell a pack called "Planning for Real for Schools" for about 38: for KS1&2, cross-curriculum.
This teacher's pack allows school children to experience the complexity of environmental issues. It also helps them discover how local democracy can work in practice, and how they can be involved. See publications section of site.

Channel 4 has an animated interactive website backing up its programmes on citizenship and sustainability
http://www.4learning.co.uk/planet/index.html

The Citizen's Foundation sell a book 'Good Thinking', good reviews (****** from schoolsnet)

http://www.citfou.org.uk/our_work/pub.php4

http://www.childrens-express.org/teachers/teachers/citizens_KS4_intro.htm worth seeing - lots of resources for KS3 and KS4, based on stories from the media, including journalism by young people.

http://www.standards.dfee.gov.uk/schemes2/citizenship/ gives guidance notes on the curriculum

http://www.tidec.org/Catalogue%20pages/catalogue.html various resources
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GOOD EXAMPLES

UK Schools

http://www.wwflearning.co.uk/resource/ The World Wide Fund for Nature
The World Wide Fund for Nature website has some downloadable resources, including many examples of projects in UK schools, plus how education in sustainable development has been integrated into the curriculum in a wide range of subjects.

e.g. In March 1999, Cassop Primary School in Co. Durham became the first wind-powered school in Great Britain with the installation of a 50kw turbine in the school field. http://www.wwflearning.co.uk/news/features_0000000190.asp

http://www.schoolenergy.org.uk/se_england.asp Wilnecott Junior saves money on energy to spend on projects.

http://members.aol.com/selwoodsch/report.htm Example of projects in one school

Manchester Environmental Resource Community Initiative - MERCI 
http://www.bridge-5.org An old mill converted to be a community and environmental resource centre. The builders had been unskilled long-term unemployed, who volunteered to be trained, and are now trained and employed tradesmen. Conversion used mostly reclaimed materials, and environment-friendly and creative-looking techniques. Bridge 5 Mill is now a really friendly place, with lots of good events. There is a cafe, garden, solar panels, heat pump (takes energy from nearby canal), library and resource centre, meeting room, and exhibition space. They have brought out a video of their story of the project, with rather slightly dodgy sound quality, loud dance music, and very organised and enthusiastic people.

Village Homes, Davis, California is a development of 200 homes built in the 1970's

http://www.islandpress.org/community/planning/greener.html

Designed in features include:
*All houses face south to make use of the sun.
*The homes incorporate solar hot water and electricity systems.
*Many trees are planted along the roads to cool the estate (this is California).
*Many fruit and nut trees and veg/fruit grown on the estate.
*Natural drainage system - ponds, slopes etc drain off stormwater to avoid flooding.
*The whole estate is laid out to be pleasant to spend time in, with many gardens and parks and things such as a community centre.
*Cycle paths make it possible to reach every part of the development or the nearby town easily by foot or bike.

The results after 20 years:
*Fuel bills are 30-50% less than similar houses built in the usual manner
*Very low crime rate
*Homes sell for around 20% more than similar homes elsewhere, and need no advertising.
*People rarely move, as Village Homes is such a good place to live.
*The cycle paths make it pleasant and easy to walk or cycle about.

http://arch.ced.berkeley.edu/vitalsigns/workup/siegel_house/vh_bkgd.html
http://www.communitygreens.org/ExistingGreens/villagehomes/villagehomes.htm
http://www.lgc.org/freepub/land_use/models/village_homes.html
http://www.rmi.org/sitepages/pid209.php
http://www.ecocomposite.org/building/villagehomes.htm
http://www.eslarp.uiuc.edu/la/LA338-S01/groups/c/DavisCA.html

http://www.sherwoodenergyvillage.co.uk/
a 91-acre former colliery site in Nottingham - new industry, housing, leisure etc. All the housing is energy-efficient. Project was set up by miners when mine closed.
also see www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/changing places

http://www.zedfactory.com/bedzed/bedzed.html A new urban high density development, an urban 'ecovillage' in Southern England. Clever design putting together different established techniques. Used lots of recycled materials.

http://www.hockerton.demon.co.uk/ The Hockerton Housing Project is the UK's first earth sheltered, self-sufficient ecological housing development. A terrace of 5 houses in Nottinghamshire, self-sufficient in energy (through windmill) and water (filtered rainwater). The houses take almost no energy to heat.

Interface - www.interfaceeurope.inc Large manufacturer making 100% recyclable/recycled carpets in a factory powered by renewable energy . When the customer is finished with their product, Interface take it back and make it into new carpet. The story of how they changed is worth seeing: more in 'sustainability stories'

Earth Balance, Northumberland

A network of organic farm, bakery, brewery, trout farm, aviary, reedbeds for sewage disposal, renewable energy systems, visitors centre, textile recycling business, nature reserve and training centre, etc..

It all fits together - eg the farm grows wheat for the bakery, and barley to brew beer. The wastes go into the reed beds and fish farm. The cafe sells their own bread, beer and meals made from their veg.

http://www.accesstourism.com/earth.html
http://www.schumacher.org.uk/past_award_1999.htm

Cafe http://www.gkn57.dial.pipex.com/TerraFermaHome.shtml

Bakery http://www.poptel.org.uk/aries/tse-reports/archive/msg00151.html

www.zeri.org The Zero Emissions Research Institute (based in Switzerland) work in many countries developing technology which produces no net pollution and relies on natural raw materials.

eg. Building earthquake-proof houses of bamboo in the earthquake prone countries of South America. In recent 'quakes, theirs were the only houses left standing. Instead of using manmade chemicals, the wood is preserved by smoking it using bamboo shavings, rather like the kipper yards. They have good ideas on economics and industry based on their own and similar experience.

Gaviotas is a village in Colombia founded 25 years ago in the bare savanna. They earn a living by inventing and manufacturing good quality, innovative machines, such as windmills suitable to the breezes in their area, solar cookers etc. They have planted millions of pine trees, which they tap for resin to manufacture paints, varnishes etc. The native rainforest is coming back in the shade of the pines, and so are the birds and animals. The buildings, farms, energy generation etc are all really good examples of ecological design.

' These aren't free love hippies, they're serious people committed to flourishing in a world of shrinking resources; After nearly a quarter century, Gaviotas makes already stale phrases like sustainable development and appropriate technology seem not just believable, but fresh and surprising'.

Many of the villagers were academics: the village is a good example of 'action research' - researched, applied then refined design.

http://www.context.org/ICLIB/IC42/Colombia.htm
http://www.enn.com/enn-features-archive/2000/03/03232000/gaviotas_10055.asp
http://www.chelseagreen.com/Gaviotas/
http://www.dharma-haven.org/five-havens/weisman.htm

Ducks in Paddyfields The Furunos are a Japanese farming couple who do not use chemicals. Their system uses ducklings to fertilise the fields and eat the weeds. The rice has a very high yield and they get four different harvests: rice, fish (roach), eggs and ducks. In spite of having spent their life perfecting the system they are happy for it to be used by anyone: "financial success is unimportant. We did not patent the method, we just want it to be widely adopted" 10,000 farmers in Japan now use the method in Japan and it is spreading throughout South-East Asia. The yields are high, enough to make Japan self-sufficient in food, but the government persists in supporting and subsidising chemical methods using imported seed.

for more info on the design principles used to set up similar systems see:
www.permaculture.co.uk www.permaculture.org.uk www.zeri.org
http://pages.unisonfree.net/gburnett/Perma/ www.soilassociation.org
 
The first sustainable solar community development in South Africa. A solar-powered village which cost no more than the usual way of doing things. The residents built their own houses. http://sbn.netforchange.com/articles/sep98-1.html

A city eco-house - renovation of Victorian terrace http://www.abc.net.au/science/planet/house/default.htm
the main site isn't good for sustainability though.

More UK projects - see: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/changingplaces Regular series and backup website to lots of projects in places around Britain, from Highlands to Welsh Valleys to Inner Cities. Covering renewable energy, recycling, local food, self-build housing, and often makes the point that economic and social regeneration is based on making the most of local resources, in a sustainable way, and making sure money made from these projects stays local as much as possible. You can call this building up capital (of teamwork, skills, infrastructure, strong local economy, natural resources etc) so as to live on the interest.

www.bigbarn.co.uk an example of ingenious website design
you type in your postcode to see a map of your area showing your local small food producers (no Manx yet)

www.nif.co.uk The Neighbourhood Initiatives Foundation - easy to use design for urban regeneration.

Energy:
Scotland could be self sufficient in renewable energy, says Energy Minister:
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/pages/news/2001/12/SE5008.aspx
http://www.britishwindenergy.co.uk/news-centre.html

www.windpower.org The official site of the Danish Windpower industry.

An extremely good reference book is 'The Little Earth Book' 4.99 - Alastair Sawday Publishing ISBN 1-901970-23-X. Lots of very short (5 mins), to the point chapters which go to the point of all the aspects of sustainability. e.g. one chapter on global warming, one about farming, one about why suddenly cod is an endangered species. Also some good news. The whole book read from start to finish (2 hours) gives a really thorough grounding.

The best place for up to date information on climate change and its likely impacts is probably
The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change http://www.ipcc.ch

World Scientist's Warning to Humanity www.ucsusa.org.uk

A large number of Nobel Scientists (most of the science Nobel prize-winners) warned in 1992 that:

'Human beings and the natural world are on a collision course. Human activities inflict harsh and often irreversible damage on the environment and on critical resources. If not checked, many of our current practices put at serious risk the future that we wish for human society and the plant and animal kingdoms, and may so alter the living world that it will be unable to sustain life in the manner that we know. Fundamental changes are urgent if we are to avoid the collision our present course will bring about.

Acting on this recognition is not altruism, but enlightened self-interest: whether industrialized or not, we all have but one lifeboat. No nation can escape from injury when global biological systems are damaged. No nation can escape from conflicts over increasingly scarce resources. In addition, environmental and economic instabilities will cause mass migrations with incalculable consequences for developed and undeveloped nations alike.'

They then go into details on what they think the answers are.

www.foe.co.uk, www.foei.org , www.greenpeace.org.uk are comprehensive sites

The Worldwatch Institute http://www.worldwatch.org/

Produce an annual detailed report on the state of the world.
e.g. state of agriculture , extract from worldwatch '95 at: http://www.context.org/ICLIB/IC42/Orr.htm

A good explanation of sustainability for older students:

http://www.sustainablemeasures.com/Sustainability/

www.rachel.org environmental news service
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BACKUP INFORMATION FOR TEACHERS

Council for Environmental Education http://www.cee.org.uk/ reviews, regular e-newsletters, links etc

http://www.wwflearning.co.uk/activities/ lots of resources, including downloadable activities and lots of good examples of UK schools' ways of addressing citizenship and sustainability, plus school news.

http://www.nc.uk.net/esd/ guidance for schools and teachers on the curriculum/sustainability/citizenship

Lots of resources, games, cd-roms curriculum materials at: http://www.greencode.org.uk/

http://www.arandaps.act.edu.au/environment/activity/index.htm
http://www.webconx.com/links/education.html

http://www.dep.org.uk/globalexpress/
A rapid response information series for schools on world events in the news.

http://www.oneworld.org/
A site of news, issues and campaigns related to the developing world. Includes links to over 450 non-governmental organisations.

http://www.pavilion.co.uk/dwakefield/
http://easyweb.easynet.co.uk/~rwilliams/ http://easyweb.easynet.co.uk/%7Erwilliams/
Two useful and enthusiastic sites for both teachers and students of geography with a range of activities, book reviews, chat rooms and links.

http://www.idealist.org/kat/teachers.html US site with lots of good links

Schools Toolkit CD-rom from DEFRA, UK http://www.bre.co.uk

To help schools reduce their environmental impacts. 'The Schools Toolkit can make a valuable contribution to student's education in several areas of the curriculum. Pupils can be involved in identifying problems, defining solutions and implementing changes, and in doing so will utilise maths, science and IT skills.' Every UK school received one. Contact Point: Alan Yates 01923 664000
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